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#31 RE: How to boost the Intel AHCI performance by Fernando 31.01.2015 14:09

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As a consequence of >this< thread I have just updated the start post of this thread.

#32 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by e.v.o 15.08.2015 03:10

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Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Clean the SSD you want to use as system drive
    • Unless you start with a brandnew SSD, I recommend to do a "Secure Erasure" of the future system drive SSD (all existing data of the SSD will be lost!). You can use either the specific SSD tool offered by the manufacturer of the SSDs (look >here<) or a universally usable tool like "Parted Magic" (not recommended for M.2 PCIe SSDs!).


  • Never ever do this to a SSD! Since a SSD works completly different then a HDD you don't have to wipe the complete SSD since it doesn't make any difference. This won't gain any performance and is simply hurting the SSD. Please don't do this!

    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Do a fresh OS installation:
    • Use an original or correctly updated/customized OS image as source. I do not recommend to transfer/clone an already previously existing system partion.
    • Take care of the correct partition alignment! Let the Win7/8/10 Setup do the job or use the "diskpart" commands manually.


  • I would not recommend partition a SSD. On a HDD it made sense to do so since the most needed data was written/read first where the HDD was faster. Always do a clean installation. I know that it sometimes is a pain in the ass but this is the only real way to install a new OS and get the best result. From my opinion everything else is just plain bullshit.

    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Optimize the OS configuration:
    • When you install any applications, which are permanently running in the background (like Antivirus software), choose a product, which has just a very moderate impact on the system performance.


  • You normally don't need any AntiVirus/AntiTrojan Software: just keep your browser updated, disable Flash and Java and your good. If you relly think you need a Virus Scanner then just stick with the integrated Windows Defender since it is suitable for nearly every user and uses the least amount of performance.

    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Enable the Device Manager Write Caching options:
    • Open the Device Manager.
    • Open the section "Disks".
    • Right click onto the listed system drive and choose the Option "Properties".
    • Hit the tab "Policies".
    • Enable both options as shown here:

      Warning: Turning off the write-cache buffer flushing (second option) may cause a data loss in case of a power interruption or unexspected reboot.
    • Hit "OK".
      Attention:
      Due to a Win7 bug regarding the "Policies" settings of the disks within the Device Manager it may be needed to uncheck both options, then to reboot and to check them again. Otherwise you may get vice versa effects.


  • I would also not recommend this since it won't impact performane in a way that you want this feature. This will just bring more problems with it then you will gain in performance. Just leave it like it is.

    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Disable the Link Power Management (LPM).
    This action requires the installation of the Intel(R) Rapid Storage Technology Software and is only recommended for AHCI users, who have installed the complete Intel RST Drivers & Software Set anyway.
    Note: The LPM settings will be lost at once, when the Intel RST Software will be uninstalled.
    Do the following:
    • Run the Intel(R) Rapid Storage Technology Console Software.
    • Hit the tab "Performance".
    • Set the "Link Power Management" to "Disabled". This is what you will get:
    • Close the Intel RST Console.
    • My tip: Disable all Intel RST Services, which are running in the background.


  • It is possible to get these and other related settings back with a neat little registry hack:
    http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/177...-hipm-dipm.html
    http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/507...management.html
    http://www.hardwareluxx.de/community/f22...gen-793649.html
    But since it won't help everybody to gain performance just try it for yourself...

    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Minimize the background processes:
    • Uninstall not essentially needed programs (like the Intel RST Software) or disable their Services.
    • Run the Task Manager and hit the tab "Startup"
    • Set all unneeded programs to "Disabled". Look here:
  • Clean your SSD(s)
    • Empty the Recycle Bin.
    • Send TRIM commands into the SSD(s), provided that TRIM is supported by your RAID system.
      This can be done by
      • a) the special tool, which is provided by the SSD manufacturer (e.g. Intel SSD Toolbox),
      • b) the Win8/8.1 "Optimizer" (former Defrag Tool, for details and restrictions please read >this< thread.) or
      • c) the "TRIM triggering" option of "Anvil's Storage Tool".
    [/li][/ol]

  • Just leave those services running since they normally won't hurt anybody and you won't kill the real read/write monsters. For this you have to open the ressource monitor and check for every file .ETL/.EVTX that gets written. Simply end all logging (you have to do this manually...) and all performance counters. This will save you the most reads and write windows does and will gain a lot of performance in write intensive apps.
    Also don't mess with TRIM. You don't need no extra software. Just install the software that is supplied with your SSD or leave it like it is.

    oh and one thing:
    NEVER EVER DEFRAG YOUR SSD! NEVER! EVER! It is impossible to defrag a SSD. Just understand how a SSD works if you want to know why.

    #33 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Fernando 16.08.2015 21:48

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    Zitat von e.v.o im Beitrag #32
    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #1
  • Clean the SSD you want to use as system drive
    • Unless you start with a brandnew SSD, I recommend to do a "Secure Erasure" of the future system drive SSD (all existing data of the SSD will be lost!). You can use either the specific SSD tool offered by the manufacturer of the SSDs (look >here<) or a universally usable tool like "Parted Magic" (not recommended for M.2 PCIe SSDs!).

  • Never ever do this to a SSD! Since a SSD works completly different then a HDD you don't have to wipe the complete SSD since it doesn't make any difference. This won't gain any performance and is simply hurting the SSD. Please don't do this!
    I do not agree with you.
    A secure erasure of the SSD may not be needed for SSDs with an active and good TRIM support, but there are others, who don't have it.
    By the way: I have secure erased my SSDs many times (to be sure, that all cells are free of garbage) and haven't yet seen any problem caused by this procedure.

    #34 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by e.v.o 17.08.2015 13:47

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    Well.. then let me get this clear: it is not possible to completely securly erase a SSD. This has nothing to do with TRIM but with the inner workings of an SSD. You could fill the complete SSD (not delete or overwrite!) with data but that won't guarantee you that everything gets wiped. This is the only and far more better option you could take and really: that doesnt make sense either.

    You could securly erase a SSD (via simply filling the whole SSD with random data, not null data!) but it won't make a difference since you can't overwrite every block. If you change a file on a SSD and save it, it doesn't get written to the exact same block it was read from (like on a HDD). TRIM is only a ATA/OS feature which "has nothing to do with the inner workings" of an SSD. Normally you don't get access to the overprovisioning area which gets used.

    And last but not least: why should i ever secure erase a SSD? It won't make any difference in performance since for the SSD controller the blocks are free anyway. You just say to do it but don't say why one should do it and how you think the performance/optimization is achieved.

    I would really recommend to change this information or better delete it since it is false. If you have plausible information that you could share with me that will get me wrong i will change my mind. But as far as i know and as far as the facts about the inner workings of a SSD are it is not a good advise to secure erase a SSD.

    btw: a cell doesnt mind if theres a 0 or 1 in it so there cant be garbage in it. i know that you won't see any problems with this in the first place but since it is hurting the write cycle that gets increased you will degrade your SSD without any need. and also one other thing: the controller inside a SSD uses a specific algo to get data written (HDDs also have this but there it is working completely different and serves another purpose). So if you only fill your SSD with zeros you won't end up having a SSD that is filled with zeros ;)

    pps: if you want to destroy the data on a SSD and you could also put it into a oven for one (better two) week(s) with at least 80°C in it. you will end up with a SSD completely filled with garbage.

    ppps: the OS specific values for ASPM and LPM won't work every time since they could be set in the BIOS/UEFI to only accept values from the BIOS/UEFI or the device(s) itself. The options in Windows will then make no change. So it would be good if you add the information to set the correct settings in the BIOS/UEFI first and then use the Windows settings.

    #35 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Fernando 17.08.2015 22:55

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    Zitat von e.v.o im Beitrag #34
    I would really recommend to change this information or better delete it since it is false.
    So our opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs seems to be quite different.
    What I have written within the start post is the way I am trying to boost the performance of my AHCI system and the result of my own intensive tests. That is why I will not delete parts of my recommendations, unless I am really convinced, that they are faulty or useless.
    Nevertheless I will add a link to your last statement to my start post. This way I will let the users know, that there are different opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs.

    #36 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by e.v.o 17.08.2015 23:51

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    Zitat von Fernando im Beitrag #35
    Zitat von e.v.o im Beitrag #34
    I would really recommend to change this information or better delete it since it is false.
    So our opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs seems to be quite different.
    What I have written within the start post is the way I am trying to boost the performance of my AHCI system and the result of my own intensive tests. That is why I will not delete parts of my recommendations, unless I am really convinced, that they are faulty or useless.
    Nevertheless I will add a link to your last statement to my start post. This way I will let the users know, that there are different opinions about the sense and the benefit of a secure erasure of SSDs.


    hehe.. sorry.. seems a bit aggressiv from me but I can't understand why and how some of the stated information should boost performance. Some tips are really great and i think that most people don't know about it.

    #37 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Fernando 18.08.2015 00:07

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    @ e.v.o:

    It would be great, if you would present your own recommendations about how to boost the performance of an AHCI (and RAID0) system.
    Then the users will be able to compare the results.

    #38 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Nyamp 15.08.2017 06:46

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    Does this driver improves HDD performance as well? Is it worth to install Intel RST driver for only 2 HDDs?

    #39 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Fernando 15.08.2017 10:31

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    Zitat von Nyamp im Beitrag #38
    Does this driver improves HDD performance as well? Is it worth to install Intel RST driver for only 2 HDDs?
    Why don't you test it yourself? It is absolutely safe and very easy to change the AHCI driver (e.g. to switch from the MS in-box AHCI driver to an Intel RST one. You can find the Intel AHCI driver, which I recommend to use with different Intel Chipsets, within the start post of >this< thread (look into the table at the bottom).

    #40 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by SkOrPn 23.10.2017 20:17

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    Anyone know if its possible to get Windows 10 to treat a USB 3.1 SSD (Crucial C300 on a USB 3.1 adapter) to be seen as a Solid State Drive for proper optimization? Just curious if that is possible.

    #41 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by guigo21 25.11.2017 20:18

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    About the secure erase... Can I use the tool within my motherboard (Asus Z270E) or it must be a specific ssd tool? I have a Samsung 850 EVO.

    #42 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Fernando 25.11.2017 21:35

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    @guigo21:
    Usually a secure erasure of the data is only required, if TRIM is not able to make all unusable SSD cells fit again. When I am going to secure erase the data of an SSD, I always use the tool Parted Magic.

    #43 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Vasudev 07.12.2017 20:27

    I'm sorry if this post isn't in proper place.
    @Fernando I'm a huge fan of your forum and always followed your guides. Last week, I was unhappy about the performance of my NVMe SSD PM951 because it lacked proper drivers from Samsung and MSFT default driver was giving too slow write speed and I decided to try newer Samsung driver v2.1 and was delighted to see the snappiness of the system, it was difference of night and day for me. That happiness was short lived, tuned out it had a bug wherein your becomes undetectable after a restart. Windows Boot mgr throws errors saying boot media inaccessible. So, I did a soft reset and viola! it worked. So I thought soft resetting every time is not a good idea and saw Side by side inf files stornvme and secnvme. Interestingly, in secnvme I noticed that most options including power savings and other things were similar to stornvme but with one difference the driver had Message Signal Queue or MSI-X queue set to 2048 instead of deafult value of stornvme driver set to 65.
    I tried changing the value in inf and every time it threw a error saying file not found. So, I started digging registry editor using Dev id in device manager of Microsoft NVMe controller on PM951 and then I came to a conclusion to change MSI-X queue limit on default storage driver of nvme to that of Samsung's value.
    After that tweak everything was super snappy like Samsung nvme driver but this is the full potential of Microsoft nvme driver when tweaked correctly. Hopefully, I can say the tweak is applicable to Samsung PM/SM/Consumer ones(950,960 and above), Toshiba branded SSDs, Hynix, Lite-On etc. Give this tweak a try. But to be on safe side make a restore point.

    You can use this image to understand everything:


    Initially I used the above trick for this tweak then after a lot googling, I found a utility created just for this process by mbk1969 at git https://github.com/CHEF-KOCH/MSI-utility
    So if you use that utility, just change the Message Number limit to 2048 from 65. This limit is the max value PCIe 3.0 can handle, so NVMe drives will benefit from that.
    See this picture:


    Benchmarks to prove the tweak works:

    1. Samsung NVMe driver on PM951:


    2. MSFT Stock NVMe driver (No tweak):


    3. MSFT Stock Nvme driver (with tweak):



    I hope everybody can find this tweak helpful especially for those people who have issues with Samsung drivers like High Number of Unsafe shutddown counts in HWINFO, Boot media inaccessible after a reboot, BSOD/GSOD etc..
    If you are on laptop with NVMe and after using this tweak you can enable power savings for RST driver for SATA link for power savings and also run this bat file for better battery life and control over how windows can be further optimised for power savings. These tweaks add 10-30 mins of battery life. See this link https://gist.github.com/theultramage/cbd...2669a6255b4b94b
    EDIT: Mods can edit the post if needed.
    EDIT2: Posted the wrong picture in changing message limit using msiutil.

    EDIT by Fernando: Inserted pictures resized and re-attached by using the Forum software (can be enlarged by clicking onto them)

    #44 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Fernando 07.12.2017 23:12

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    @Vasudev:
    Welcome to the Win-RAID Forum and thank you very much for your interesting report and your find how to boost the performance of the MS Win10 in-box NVMe driver.
    Since all your WRITE scores (incl. those after having done the tweak) are much lower than they should be, I would like to know, whether you had followed point 8 of my advices given within the start post of this thread.

    Although I haven't yet tried your tweak, I want to show you the benchmark results I got with my untweaked new notebook Xiaomi Air 13,3 (with Kaby Lake CPU) running Win10 x64 v1709 with different NVMe drivers on a 250 GB Samsung PM961 NVMe SSD:

    Left picture: Win10 in-box NVMe driver - Right picture: Samsung NVMe driver v2.3.0.1709 WHQL


    Regards
    Dieter (alias Fernando)

    #45 RE: How to boost the AHCI performance of Intel Chipset systems by Vasudev 08.12.2017 09:08

    @Fernando:
    I tried those tweaks and reverted back to defaults because couple of weeks ago my battery died suddenly w/o any notice so I switched back.
    With write cache off and cache flushing turned off on tweaked stornvme


    With write cache ON and unchecked Turn off cache flush


    Even with FUA the write speed are better. On your laptop you can enable IRST's SATA power link management to reduce CPU idle wattage to 0.5-0.7W instead of 1.5W.
    One more thing I found using Linux is that in Gnome Disk utility benching of 100 Samples of 100-500MB gave a read speeds of 2.1GB and writes of 174MB. Tried for a 1GB data for 100 samples too, the performance readings was similar. So I came to a conclusion that Windows or its driver is holding back its full performance somehow.
    You can test it yourself on SM951, PM961 or on 950 pro NVMe SSDs or even ask your friends to try this tweak. I can't say about desktop because I have only a laptop with me, so battery life is most important to me when I'm unplugged.
    Thank you @Fernando

    EDIT by Fernando: Unneeded fully quoted post replaced by a directly addressing to the author (to save space)

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